Research Shows Vaccine made from Spider Web can Prevent Cancer

Now a cancer vaccine has been made from a spider web to prevent cancer. In fact, scientists have developed such microsecule capsules made from spider web fibers that can reach cancer cells directly to the immune cells. Researchers use this type of vaccine to fight cancer, which can activate the immune system and identify and destroy tumor cells.

Nonetheless, the response from the immune system is expected, but it can not always be found. In order to increase the effect of vaccine on the immune system and especially T lymphocyte cells that identify cancer cells, researchers have created micro-capsules made of spider web fibers capable of reaching the vaccine directly to the center of the immune cells.

This type of microsecope has developed capsules from the University of Freiburg and Ludwik McGimilian University, Munich researchers. There are two types of cells in our immune system: A B lymphocytes that produce antibodies to fight various infections. The second cells are T lymphocytes. Apart from cancer, there is a need to activate T lymphocytes in cases of some communicable diseases like TB. This process, described in the study published in ‘Journal Biomaterials’, can also be applied to preventive vaccines to protect against communicable diseases.

Carol Borquin of Geneva University (UNIGEG) said that it is necessary to generate the reaction of T lymphocytes to develop effective immunotherapy treatment against cancer. He said, ‘Existing vaccines have only limited amount of T-cells, so to overcome this problem, it is also important to develop other vaccine procedures.

Karen Allowa

Karen Allowa is a reporter for News Australia Today.  After graduating from university, Karen got an internship at Northern Territory News and worked as a reporter for Darwin the the Northern Territory.  Karen has also worked as a reporter for The Canberra Times.  Karen covers entertainment and community events for News Australia Today.